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News From the Frontlines

From Frontlines to Headlines! March

A DIGEST OF PRESS CLIPS ABOUT LIBERTY HILL & THE ORGANIZERS WE SUPPORT

 

IMMIGRATION
 
Reverend Zach Hoover, executive director of the interfaith community organization L.A. Voice, is among the religious leaders who've come together in the Rapid Response Team, a network of sanctuary spaces for families who may be sought by ICE. The network and some of its members are described in a report on CNN.
 
The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) has been offering free help with citizenship applications during President Trump’s first 100 days in office. Lines have been long and CHIRLA helps about 30 to 50 people a day, compared with the pre-election two to three people per week, according to WBEZ, a Chicago NPR affiliate. As seen on Care2, they also process applications for temporary guardianship for children of immigrants. In addition, CHIRLA has been supporting residents during Immigration and Customs Enforcement raids in L.A. and surrounding counties, according to articles in Time and the Los Angeles Times. They have also been holding weekly “Know Your Rights” seminars (LAist), were featured in an article on Slate about deportation, and joined a panel offering advice for immigrants (Pasadena News Now).
 
 
POLICING & CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM
 
Los Angeles Police Commission Board member and Liberty Hill President/CEO Shane Murphy Goldsmith raised concerns about a spike in shootings by police officers, compared with stats from 2016. L.A. Times coverage of the situation included quotes from Goldsmith.
 
Leaders and members of the South L.A. community gathered to remember Trayvon Martin. They also discussed relationships with law enforcement and solidarity with the Anaheim youth who was involved in an incident with an off-duty LAPD officer. Community Coalition hosted the event and the Los Angeles Sentinel reported on it.
 
The Inquirer.Net reported on the Pilipino Workers Center’s commemoration of the 31st anniversary of the Pilipino EDSA revolution, a campaign against regime violence and electoral fraud during the mid-1980s. 
 
Protesters, many affiliated with Dignity and Power Now, demonstrated outside of the main jail complex in Downtown L.A. over concerns about inmate deaths and conditions in county-run jails, as reported in the L.A. Times.
 
 
ECONOMIC JUSTICE
 
In a debate moderated by NBC L.A., Cynthia Strathmann, Ph.D., who is executive director of Strategic Actions for a Just Economy (SAJE), spoke out against Measure S and its potential negative impact on affordable housing. Voters shot down the measure on March 7.
 
Formerly incarcerated individuals made thousands of phone calls to convince voters to support Measure H and oppose Measure S during the recent Los Angeles election. These individuals were organized by L.A. VoiceLAist reports.
 
The Los Angeles Sentinel spoke with Pete White of Los Angeles Community Action Network (LA-CAN) about the roots of his activism on Skid Row, and how LA-CAN is bringing fresh produce to underserved communities.
 
 
ENVIRONMENT
 
Communities for a Better Environment is organizing a march in Wilmington against Tesoro (formerly known as Texaco). The company plans to merge two large refineries in the area, which would negatively affect climate change and health in the community. The Santa Monica Observer covered the story and Fast Co.Exist expanded on the oil-drilling situation in low income L.A. communities, including Wilmington. NPR also mentioned the group in a report about how environmental cap-and-trade programs aren’t doing enough to help communities like Wilmington, where residents are twice as likely as other Angelenos to develop cancer.
 
Thelmy Pérez, an organizer with L.A. Human Right to Housing Collective, has been helping residents of the Jordan Downs housing project in Watts fight for higher standards of living and an environmentally safe neighborhood. High Country News wrote a detailed article about the situation.
 
Workers from Arcadis U.S. Inc., one of two contractors tasked with sampling homes for lead near the toxic Exide Technologies recycling plant, were accused of making racially derogatory remarks to residents in southeast L.A., as reported by the L.A. Times. East Yard Communities for Environmental Justice has expressed concerns about Exide’s cleanup in the community.