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Liberty Hill Announces 2017 Rapid Response Fund Grants

Liberty Hill Foundation, L.A.'s fast-forward social-justice accelerator, announces the recipients of its 2017 Rapid Response grants.

The Rapid Response Fund for Racial Justice, an innovative funding pool created to support grassroots organizations pressing for urgently needed police reforms and a renewed commitment to racial justice in California, was expanded this year in the wake of the aggressive attacks on progressive policies from Washington. A no-red-tape grantmaking program of quick funding for immediate action, the Fund now also supports organizers working on issues at the intersection of immigration and law enforcement as well as those resisting hate crimes against people of color and LGBTQ communities. 

Thanks to continuing support from The California Wellness Foundation, the Rapid Response Fund for Racial Justice provides grants of up to $10,000. Last year we awarded 17 grants. This year we stepped it up, awarding 27 grants. Nearly 60% of the grants supported rapid response defense networks, "know your rights" workshops, quickly-organized public forums and community briefings, and strong resistance/mobilizing against ICE raids, deportations, Muslim bans and hate crimes. While there are many overlapping actions, 30% of the grants are targeted to racial justice and related issues such as police accountability.

Liberty Hill's grantmaking through this fund strengthens social justice movement organizations on the ground in California to sustain the momentum needed to protect vulnerable communities and at the same time advance a progressive agenda in a bitterly divided political climate. Examples of funded activities also include leadership development, media and outreach campaigns, organizer training, organizing and mobilizing efforts, forming or engaging coalitions, strategy development, and technical assistance.

Liberty Hill is proud to announce the following recipients of 2017 Rapid Response Fund for Racial Justice grants. 

1.            Avance Schools, Inc.

To address racial justice issues in the community of Highland Park through a series of community clinic and outreach sessions, and shared policy toolkit for over 100 public schools in California.

2.            ACCE Institute

To lead organizing for economic justice with low income senior and working class homeowners and tenants who are impacted by the foreclosure and cost of housing crisis.

3.            Causa Justice: Just Cause

To support its Black Priorities Project for grassroots Black community engagement needed to create and win healthy, diverse, and stable communities.

4.            Central American Resource Center

To combat the increased impact of policing, raids, detention and deportations through know your rights workshops, popular assemblies and community dialogues, and coalition building.

5.            CLEAN Carwash Campaign

A project of Korean Immigrant Workers Advocates of Southern California, to educate, train and activate 300 carwash worker members around issues of immigrant rights.

6.            Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles

To improve the lives of immigrant families through the California Domestic Workers Bill of Rights, fair wages, access to healthcare, defense of DACA/DAPA and civic engagement.

7.            Comunidades Indígenas en Liderazgo

A project of Red Mexicana De Líderes Y Organizaciones Migrantes, for its Indigenous Court Interpreter Training for language access rights, cultural preservation and reproductive justice.

8.            Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement

A project of Inland Congregations United for Change Sponsoring Committee, Inc., for deportation defense, base building and coalition work in the Los Angeles area.

9.            Fathers and Families of San Joaquin

To advance policies to defend and protect communities of color facing increased hate crimes/incidents and systemic injustices such as surveillance, racial profiling, and deportation.

10.          Instituto de Educación Popular del Sur de California

To support the L.A. Domestic Worker/Day Laborer Defense Campaign and invest in tools for rapid communication regarding attacks, including ICE raids and labor violations.

11.          Inland Coalition for Immigrant Justice

A project of Inland Congregations United for Change Sponsoring Committee, Inc., to improve the quality of education through its United Students and Padres Unidos organizing components.

12.          Khmer Girls in Action     

To develop Long Beach’s Rapid Response Network to ensure defense of vulnerable families and build strong collaboration in Long Beach to resist and push for strong sanctuary language in city policy.

13.          Koreatown Immigrant Workers Alliance

To enforce new wage theft policies and fight gentrification and displacement among economically underserved low wage Koreatown residents and low wage workers in Koreatown.

14.          Korean Resource Center

To support its Immigrant Rapid Response Plan, which empowers undocumented Asian American and Pacific Islanders address racism, xenophobia and bullying.

15.          LA Voice

To increase the quality of life for immigrants and the formerly incarcerated by fighting for reentry programs and rehabilitation, and empowering low income people who are facing transit expansion.

16.          Mujeres Unidas y Activas

To strengthen the organization’s capacity to defend vulnerable immigrant communities through rapid response mobilizing and texting technology training for member leaders.

17.          National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance

For organizing and trainings among LGBTQ Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and Pacific Islanders (APIs) at the intersection of racial justice, immigrants’ rights, trans justice and queerness.

18.          National Day Laborer Organizing Network

To build organizing support to strengthen grassroots resistance initiatives while quickly responding to emerging administrative and legislative threats. 

19.          Pasadena Altadena Coalition of Transformative Leaders

To mobilize parents and youth to influence the City of Pasadena policy on becoming a sanctuary city and to engage local businesses to carry Know Your Rights posters. 

20.          Pillars of the Community

To work with individuals affected by abusive policing to make police accountable through “Know Your Rights” training, data collection on abusive policing, and training on how to watch the police.

21.          Pomona Economic Opportunity Center 

To deploy a rapid response strategy to defend, monitor and expose racist and hateful acts and aggressions toward immigrant workers in the Inland Empire.

22.          Resilience Orange County

A project of Charitable Ventures of Orange County, to conduct participatory research on the injustices of the crimmigration system toward policy changes that can address racial disparities.

23.          Restaurant Opportunities Centers United

For Restaurant Opportunities Centers of Los Angeles’ rapid response program to increase learning opportunities for workers who are targeted by policing and immigrant enforcement actions.

24.          Sacred Place Institute for Indigenous Peoples

A project of Seventh Generation Fund for Indigenous People, for training to achieve community-identified goals for Indigenous and human rights, and social and environmental justice in California.

25.          Time for Change Foundation

To engage collaborative partners in a 2-Day “Just IS for Just US” roundtable to strategize multiple agendas, community organizing, and to reflect on everyone’s past successes and accomplishments.

26.          Vigilant Love

A project of Asian Americans Advancing Justice-Los Angeles, to deepen the capacity of community members to resist Islamophobia through workshops addressing the mosque-to-prison pipeline.

27.          Youth Justice Coalition

To build a youth, family and prisoner-led movement to challenge the nation’s addiction to incarceration, and race, gender and class inequality throughout the juvenile justice systems.

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